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2017 hurricane season: Help for the road ahead

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season is living up to predictions of above-average activity. We are prepared to help. Zurich’s Claims team has set up a dedicated Disaster Relief Line (877-327-6779) to assist businesses affected by Harvey, Irma and future storms, and our Risk Engineers have provided resources and guidelines to consider before and after a hurricane strikes.

  • Maria

    Maria: Zurich is prepared to help

    Maria’s devastating winds and rains are taking a heavy toll on the individuals and communities in the storm’s path. Zurich is ready to help with a dedicated Disaster Relief Line (877-327-6779), in addition to our 24/7 claims reporting options, for customers and brokers affected by Irma. Zurich’s Risk Engineers and our nonprofit associate, disaster-relief organization SBP, have also supplied information and guidelines to consider, from preparation to recovery.

    FEMA

    FEMA Disaster Assistance or call 1-800-621-3362
    If you are in a life-threatening situation and you need rescue

    •  Call 911 first
    • Then your local emergency management agency. If you are unable to connect with your local emergency services, then call the U.S. Coast Guard.
      Sector San Juan CC: (787) 289-2041

     

    Those who have evacuated should continue to monitor local radio or TV stations for updated emergency information. Evacuees should not return to evacuated areas until they are told by local officials that it is safe to do so. Preemptively returning can pose significant safety risks to both evacuees and first responders.

    Key Safety Tips

    • Do not attempt to return home until local officials say it is safe to do so. Continue to monitor the weather and follow the direction of state, tribal and local officials.
    • Don't drive or walk on flooded roadways. Remember - Turn Around, Don't Drown!
    • If you are in a high-rise building and need to shelter in place, go to the first or second floor hallways or interior rooms. You want to stay on floors above floodwater or storm surge, but do not go to the highest floors due to wind impacts.
    • If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately in the center of a small interior room (closet, interior hallway) on the lowest level of a sturdy building. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.
    • More safety tips: hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes. These resources are also available in Spanish.
    • There is the potential for flooding with this storm. Driving through a flooded area can be extremely hazardous and almost half of all flash flood deaths happen in vehicles. When in your car, look out for flooding in low-lying areas, at bridges and at highway dips. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Four to eight inches of rain are expected, with 10 inch totals in isolated locations.
    • If you are in a high-rise building and instructed to shelter in place, stay on floors just above flood water or storm surge. Stay in hallways or interior rooms.
    • Once the storm has passed, survivors should expect and prepare for significant, ongoing impacts, and disruptions to daily activities.
    • We must stay vigilant and continue to monitor local radio or TV stations for updated emergency information, and follow direction of state, tribal and local officials. History shows that storm tracks can change quickly and unexpectedly.

     

    RESOURCES

    • To find family and friends or to register yourself as safe, visit the @americanredcross Safe & Well site: https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/
    • To report a missing child, contact the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-866-908-9570.
    • Visit the National Hurricane Center for the latest on the storm.
    • Visit www.ready.gov or www.listo.gov (Spanish) for tips on how to prepare for and stay safe during hurricanes and flooding.
    • To talk to a professional who can help you cope with emotional distress from the storm, call the @disasterdistressline at 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
    • Visit the FEMA Social Hub for updates from official emergency management social media accounts.
    • Download the FEMA Mobile App to receive alerts from the National Weather Service, get safety and survival tips, customize your emergency checklist, find your local shelter, and upload your disaster photos to help first responders.

     

    FEMA Social Media Accounts

     

    FEMA Emergency Lodging Assistance Program
    Find a Participating Hotel

    Additional Resources

    SBP resources

    • Zurich’s nonprofit associate, the disaster-relief organization SBP, shares a wealth of preparation and recovery guides and checklists on its website.
    • Zurich recently produced a disaster-preparedness video with disaster-relief organization SBP that you can view here.

     

    American Red Cross
    Find open shelters via American Red Cross website

    American Red Cross Safe & Well
    (Register yourself as “Safe and Well” or Search for Loved Ones)

    American Red Cross Hotline:
    1-800-733-2767

    Read more about severe weather:
    Severe weather knowledge hub

  • Irma

    Irma: Zurich is prepared to help

    Irma’s devastating winds and rains are taking a heavy toll on the individuals and communities in the storm’s path. Zurich is ready to help with a dedicated Disaster Relief Line (877-327-6779), in addition to our 24/7 claims reporting options, for customers and brokers affected by Irma. Zurich’s Risk Engineers and our nonprofit associate, disaster-relief organization SBP, have also supplied information and guidelines to consider, from preparation to recovery.

    FEMA Disaster Assistance or call 1-800-621-3362

    If you are in a life-threatening situation and you need rescue

     

    Those who have evacuated should continue to monitor local radio or TV stations for updated emergency information. Evacuees should not return to evacuated areas until they are told by local officials that it is safe to do so. Preemptively returning can pose significant safety risks to both evacuees and first responders.

    Key Safety Tips

    • Do not attempt to return home until local officials say it is safe to do so. Continue to monitor the weather and follow the direction of state, tribal and local officials.
    • Don't drive or walk on flooded roadways. Remember - Turn Around, Don't Drown!
    • If you are in a high-rise building and need to shelter in place, go to the first or second floor hallways or interior rooms. You want to stay on floors above floodwater or storm surge, but do not go to the highest floors due to wind impacts.
    • If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately in the center of a small interior room (closet, interior hallway) on the lowest level of a sturdy building. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.
    • More safety tips: hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes. These resources are also available in Spanish.
    • There is the potential for flooding with this storm. Driving through a flooded area can be extremely hazardous and almost half of all flash flood deaths happen in vehicles. When in your car, look out for flooding in low-lying areas, at bridges and at highway dips. As little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Four to eight inches of rain are expected, with 10 inch totals in isolated locations.
    • Shelter in place and evacuation orders are in effect for parts of Florida and Georgia.  All those in potentially affected areas should listen to the directions of state, local, territorial, and tribal officials. If instructed to evacuate or shelter in place, follow that direction.
    • If you are in a high-rise building and instructed to shelter in place, stay on floors just above flood water or storm surge. Stay in hallways or interior rooms.
    • Once the storm has passed, survivors should expect and prepare for significant, ongoing impacts, and disruptions to daily activities.
    • We must stay vigilant and continue to monitor local radio or TV stations for updated emergency information, and follow direction of state, tribal and local officials. History shows that storm tracks can change quickly and unexpectedly.

     

    RESOURCES

    • To find family and friends or to register yourself as safe, visit the @americanredcross Safe & Well site: https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/
    • To report a missing child, contact the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-866-908-9570.
    • Visit the National Hurricane Center for the latest on the storm.
    • Visit www.ready.gov or www.listo.gov (Spanish) for tips on how to prepare for and stay safe during hurricanes and flooding.
    • To talk to a professional who can help you cope with emotional distress from the storm, call the @disasterdistressline at 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
    • Visit the FEMA Social Hub for updates from official emergency management social media accounts.
    • Download the FEMA Mobile App to receive alerts from the National Weather Service, get safety and survival tips, customize your emergency checklist, find your local shelter, and upload your disaster photos to help first responders.

     

    FEMA Social Media Accounts

     

    FEMA Emergency Lodging Assistance Program
    Find a Participating Hotel

    Additional Resources

    SBP resources

    • Zurich’s nonprofit associate, the disaster-relief organization SBP, shares a wealth of preparation and recovery guides and checklists on its website.
    • Zurich recently produced a disaster-preparedness video with disaster-relief organization SBP that you can view here.

     

    American Red Cross
    Find open shelters via American Red Cross website

    American Red Cross Safe & Well
    (Register yourself as “Safe and Well” or Search for Loved Ones)

    American Red Cross Hotline:
    1-800-733-2767

    Read more about extreme weather:
    Severe weather knowledge hub

  • Harvey

    Harvey: Help on the path to recovery

    Harvey’s devastating impact has been felt by individuals and communities across Texas and Louisiana. For customers and brokers affected by the storm, Zurich has established a Disaster Relief Line (877-327-6779) in addition to our 24/7 claims reporting options. Zurich’s Risk Engineers and our nonprofit associate, disaster-relief organization SBP, have also supplied information and guidelines to consider as you navigate the road ahead for cleanup and recovery.

    FEMA
    If you were affected by Harvey, you can apply for assistance at:
    FEMA Disaster Assistance or call 1-800-621-3362
    Emergency phone numbers in a life-threatening situation

     

    Key Safety Tips

    • Residents of Texas and Louisiana are still not out of harm’s way.  Do not attempt to return home until local officials say it is safe to do so. Continue to monitor the weather and follow the direction of state, tribal and local officials.
    • Don't drive or walk on flooded roadways. Remember - Turn Around, Don't Drown!
    • If you are in a high-rise building and need to shelter in place, go to the first or second floor hallways or interior rooms. You want to stay on floors above floodwater or storm surge, but do not go to the highest floors due to wind impacts.
    • If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately in the center of a small interior room (closet, interior hallway) on the lowest level of a sturdy building. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.
    • More safety tips: hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes. These resources are also available in Spanish.

     

    RESOURCES

    • To help people affected by the storm, visit @nvoad’s page for a listed of trusted organizations: https://txvoad.communityos.org/cms/node/104
    • To find family and friends or to register yourself as safe, visit the @americanredcross Safe & Well site: https://safeandwell.communityos.org/cms/
    • To report a missing child, contact the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-866-908-9570.
    • To talk to a professional who can help you cope with emotional distress from the storm, call the @disasterdistressline at 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
    • Visit the FEMA Social Hub for updates from official emergency management social media accounts.
    • Download the FEMA Mobile App to receive alerts from the National Weather Service, get safety and survival tips, customize your emergency checklist, find your local shelter, and upload your disaster photos to help first responders.

     

    FEMA Social Media Accounts

     

    FEMA Emergency Lodging Assistance Program
    Find a Participating Hotel

    Additional Resources

    SBP resources

    • Zurich’s nonprofit associate, the disaster-relief organization SBP, shares a wealth of preparation and recovery guides and checklists on its website.
    • Zurich recently produced a disaster-preparedness video with disaster-relief organization SBP that you can view here.

     

    American Red Cross
    Find open shelters via American Red Cross website
    American Red Cross Safe & Well
    (Register yourself as “Safe and Well” or Search for Loved Ones)

    American Red Cross Hotline:
    1-800-733-2767

    Drivetexas.org
    (Flooded roads and conditions)